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A new arrival after 35

ARE YOU EXPECTING A LATER-IN-LIFE BABY? YOU ARE NOT ALONE—THE BIRTH RATE HAS INCREASED FOR WOMEN IN THEIR MID-40S. HOW CAN YOU PREPARE FOR THIS BIG CHANGE?

SKETCH OUT A plan of action for your pregnancy and beyond, but remember that when children are involved, things tend to become less predictable than you may initially expect. So, stay flexible and try not to stress. Aim to follow a few key tips:

1. FIND AN OB/GYN YOU TRUST. Women older than 35 are at higher risk for conditions such as gestational diabetes and high blood pressure. In the event of a complication, you want to know you are being cared for by the best provider for you.

2. BE OPEN TO LEARNING SOMETHING NEW. Birthing and parenting classes are great places to meet new moms and dads of all ages. Build a support network now and find friends to empathize with you as you navigate the sleepless nights ahead.

3. PRIORITIZE YOUR HEALTH. Taking the best possible care of yourself is especially important after the age of 35, when complications, such as miscarriage, are more common. Adequate sleep, regular exercise, and stress management will nurture you while helping your baby grow and develop in the womb.

To learn more about the Women and Infants Center at HSHS Sacred Heart Hospital, visit sacredhearteauclaire.org/

Medical-Services/Women-and-Infants-Center or call 715.717.4156.

IS IT ENDOMETRIOSIS?

THIS CONDITION OCCURS WHEN THE TISSUE THAT TYPICALLY DEVELOPS

INSIDE THE UTERUS EACH MONTH GROWS WHERE IT DOESN’T BELONG.

AFFECTED WOMEN EXPERIENCE serious pain and

Symptoms of endometriosis include:

swelling. Growths can cause scar tissue, and blood trapped in the ovaries can form cysts.

WHAT TO WATCH FOR

• Heavy bleeding during your period

• Bleeding at other times

of the month

• Severe menstrual cramps

• Pain in the abdomen, pelvis, or lower back

• Infertility

“Some women have no symptoms and don’t realize they have

endometriosis until they struggle to become pregnant,” says Chris Longbella, MD, obstetrician and gynecologist with HSHS Sacred Heart and St. Joseph’s hospitals. “Others simply assume they are experiencing normal period symptoms.”

Endometriosis is treated with hormone treatments, pain medicine, and, in some cases, surgery. Women often wait years to get a diagnosis, so if you have any concerns, be sure

to talk to your doctor. The sooner you receive a diagnosis, the

sooner you can get relief.

If you’re concerned your menstrual symptoms may be endometriosis, talk to your gynecologist.

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