First drug approved for rare eye disease

(HealthDay News) — Oxervate (cenegermin) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat neurotrophic keratitis, a rare disease of the eye’s cornea.

The cornea is the clear layer that covers the colored portion at the front of the eye.

Neurotrophic keratitis affects fewer than five in 10,000 people, the FDA said. The disease, causing loss of corneal sensation, leads to damage of this vital part of the eye.

"While the prevalence of neurotrophic keratitis is low, the impact of this serious condition on an individual patient can be devastating," Dr. Wiley Chambers, an ophthalmologist in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said in an agency news release.

Oxervate, produced as an eyedrop, was evaluated in a clinical study involving 151 people with neurotrophic keratitis. Some participants were given Oxervate, while others were given a placebo eye drop. Complete corneal healing was reported among 70 percent of people treated with Oxervate, compared with 28 percent of those given the placebo, the FDA said.

The most common side effects of the drug included eye pain, enlarged blood vessels in the eye, eye inflammation and watery eyes.

Oxervate is produced by the Italian firm Dompé farmaceutici.

More information

Visit the FDA to learn more.

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

adwpadmin

adwpadmin

More News

STORMTRACKER 18 WEATHER
Eau Claire
78°
Menomonie
67°
Chetek
62°
Durand
81°
Ladysmith
61°
Neillsville
76°
Rice Lake
61°
New Richmond
65°
Black River Falls
Medford
65°
River Falls
68°
Duluth
43°
Green Bay
60°
La Crosse
83°
Madison
78°
Milwaukee
68°
Twin Cities
71°
Connect with WQOW
Top Stories
Scroll to top
Skip to content